2021 Database of Faculty Summer Research Projects

Projects by Category

  1. Humanities: Literature, arts, civics, ethics, social systems, politics
  2. Sciences: Biological and physical science, and math
  3. Education: Teaching & learning approaches
  4. Business and Technology
  5. Health-related: Physical, emotional, psychological

Humanities Science Education Business and Technology Health-Related

Scroll down to see all projects

Humanities

Project 1: Shakespeare and Women in TV Shows and Movies;
Project 2: Disney+ Shakespeare

Faculty Mentor Dr. Amy Scott-Douglass
Academic School School of Humanities
Contact Information amysd@marymount.edu
Appropriate Majors/Programs Any major is welcome, depending on the student’s interest
Position Availability Summer 2021 (May be held on campus or remotely, as mutually agreed with the faculty mentor and as pandemic conditions require.)
Title
Project 1
Shakespeare and Women in TV Shows and Movies
Description Project 1 I am working on a book about feminist borrowings from Shakespeare in popular movies and shows, including Game of Thrones, House of Cards, Outlander, and Madam Secretary. The focus is on the cultural politics of these adaptations, particularly to how they relate to the 2016 presidential election and the time period from 2014-2020. The goal is to analyze how, by adapting character types and other elements from Shakespeare, the creators of these movies and shows are talking back to sexism, racism, and nationalism. I welcome interest from any major since the project spans multiple disciplines: English, Media and Performance Studies, Art, Graphic Design, Communication, Education, Women’s Studies, History, and Politics. Students should have an interest in researching secondary sources, both scholarly and public, on whichever component(s) of the project interests them when it comes to the plays, the movies/shows, and/or the methodological approach. Students may also help to review and analyze the primary sources of their choice, depending on the students’ own interests and research goals.
Title
Project 2
Disney+ Shakespeare
Description Project 2 Avengers, assemble! I am working on a book about borrowings from Shakespeare in popular movies and shows, including Star Wars, Coco, X-Men and the whole of the Infinity Saga from Iron Man to Spider-man: Far from Home. The focus is on the cultural politics of these adaptations. The goal is to analyze how, by adapting character types and other elements from Shakespeare, the creators of these movies and shows are talking back to racism, nationalism, and sexism. I welcome interest from any major since the project spans multiple disciplines: English, Media and Performance Studies, Art, Graphic Design, Communication, Education, Women’s Studies, History, and Politics. Students should have an interest in researching secondary sources, both scholarly and public, on whichever component(s) of the project interests them when it comes to the plays, the movies/shows, and/or the methodological approach. Students may also help to review and analyze the primary sources of their choice, depending on the students’ own interests and research goals.
Date Posted 10-Mar-21

Recovering Indigenous Voices in the Jesuit Archives

Faculty Mentor Dr. Michelle Zaleski
Academic School School of Humanities
Contact Information mzaleski@marymount.edu
Appropriate Majors/Programs Any
Position Availability Summer 2021 (May be held on campus or remotely, as mutually agreed with the faculty mentor and as pandemic conditions require.)
Description While we know the history of famous Jesuit colleges in the U.S. and Europe, schools like Georgetown and the Gregorian, we know less about Jesuits universities established outside the West. And, we know even less about the students they taught. Jesuits became famous during the Renaissance for teaching rhetoric, but what kind of voice did this give their indigenous students in the colonies? This project involves looking for indigenous voices within digitized 16th century Jesuit letters and reports about their mission to Portuguese colonial India. Students will gain familiarity with decolonial, multimodal, and translingual archival research methods. Proficiency in Portuguese, Latin, or Spanish is preferred.
Date Posted 10-Mar-21

Depictions of the Police on Television

Faculty Mentor Dr. Sarah Fischer
Academic School School of Social and Behavioral Sciences
Contact Information sfischer@marymount.edu
Appropriate Majors/Programs Any
Position Availability Summer 2021 (May be held on campus or remotely, as mutually agreed with the faculty mentor and as pandemic conditions require.)
Description Research demonstrates that the public learns about crime and police procedure primarily through television. However, most research on television’s depiction of the criminal justice system to date has analyzed who television shows portray as criminals and how shows depict the use of forensic evidence. This project involves analyzing episodes of two television shows—NBC’s Law and Order: Special Victims Unit (SVU) and BBC’s The Fall to examine their depictions of police procedure, police officers, and the decisions police officers make.
Date Posted 10-Mar-21

Project 1: Literature in Context: Open Access Digital Humanities Project;
Project 2: Horror Film: A Book Project

Faculty Mentor Dr. Tonya Howe
Academic School School of Humanities
Contact Information thowe@marymount.edu
Appropriate Majors/Programs Any/All — especially Literature, Digital Writing & Narrative Design, History, and IT
Position Availability Summer 2021 (May be held on campus or remotely, as mutually agreed with the faculty mentor and as pandemic conditions require.)
Title
Project 1
Literature in Context: Open Access Digital Humanities Project
Description Project 1 I am working on a federally-funded Open Education Resource web application called Literature in Context. I need help annotating and preparing for the web a selection of canonical literary texts. Once complete, these materials will be available on a publicly-accessible database for students like you and faculty like me to use in the classroom. We will learn basic XML development on our way. See the current website and sample texts: http://anthologydev.lib.virginia.edu
Title
Project 2
Horror Film: A Book Project
Description Project 2 I am planning a book on horror film, focusing especially on the history of horror film technology (innovation) and the self-conscious or “meta” horror film. This project will involve students watching a lot of horror films, doing research on horror films, and writing annotations of those films and research materials.
Date Posted 10-Mar-21

Urban Legends in the Middle Ages

Faculty Mentor Dr. Katie Peebles
Academic School School of Humanities
Contact Information kpeebles@marymount.edu
Appropriate Majors/Programs Art, Communication, English, Graphic Design, History, Liberal Studies, Philosophy, Politics, Theology, Education, Psychology, and Sociology
Position Availability Summer 2021 (May be held on campus or remotely, as mutually agreed with the faculty mentor and as pandemic conditions require.)
Description This project will contribute to a book and online database of urban legends from the Middle Ages. The student researcher will investigate the social and historical context of urban legends, analyze the social and psychological motivations behind the legends, seek out more examples of hidden legends, and/or improve and add to the project website.
Date Posted 10-Mar-21


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Science

Project 1: Analyzing Coronavirus Data;
Project 2: Exploring the Role of Cell Adhesion Molecules in Cancer;
Project 3: Brain Games

Faculty Mentor Dr. Amanda Wright
Academic School School of Natural Sciences and Mathematics
Contact Information awright@marymount.edu
Appropriate Majors/Programs Biology or Biochemistry
Position Availability Summer 2021
(Project 1: May be held on campus or remotely, as mutually agreed with the faculty mentor and as pandemic conditions require.)
(Project 2: On Campus)
Title
Project 1
Analyzing Coronavirus Data
Description Project 1 We will be analyzing data available from various sources to examine the spread of coronavirus through the US and other countries. Using this data as a baseline, we will use NetLogo, an agent based modeling program, to predict viral spreading behavior under different situations and circumstances. The culmination of this project will be a written case study on viral community spread that will be submitted for publication.
Title
Project 2
Exploring the role of cell adhesion molecules in Cancer
Description Project 2 Recently, cell adhesion molecule, CHL1, has been identified as an important regulator in several cancer types. In this project, we will be exploring the expression of CHL1 in different tissue types and analyzing data regarding the prevalence of this mutation in tumors.
Title
Project 3
Brain Games
Description Project 3 We will use the popular television show to develop learning modules for undergraduate neurobiology students. During this project, we will explore neurological concepts and create learning scenarios that can be implemented in the classroom.
Date Posted 10-Mar-21

Project 1: Designing Pedagogical Chemistry Games;
Project 2: Developing Chemistry Case Studies

Faculty Mentor Dr. Deana Jaber
Academic School School of Natural Sciences & Mathematics
Contact Information djaber@marymount.edu
Appropriate Majors/Programs Biology, Biochemistry, Math, Education
Position Availability Summer 2021 (May be held on campus or remotely, as mutually agreed with the faculty mentor and as pandemic conditions require.)
Title
Project 1
Designing Pedagogical Chemistry Games
Description Project 1 Game-based instructional design is well established in the literature as a creative teaching supplement. Games have been used for teaching purposes and have yielded successful pedagogical results. In this research project, the student researcher will design a card game for a chemistry concept that students struggle to understand. The student will get to choose the topic they want to work on! Our research group has developed two card games that have been published in the Journal of Chemical Education in 2017 and 2019. We are adapting these card games into a digital card game that will allow students to play these card games online. We are also currently designing a periodic table game that would be appropriate for the public in an informal learning environment. These projects would be a perfect fit for a student looking to work on a research project where chemistry and education intersect.
Title
Project 2
Developing Chemistry Case Studies
Description Project 2 Are you interested in a research project that allows you to explore science education? Do you enjoy writing fictional stories based on real-world examples? If the answer is yes, then this project might be of interest to you! The student researcher will investigate the release of per- and polyfluoroalkyl (PFAS) substances into the environment with the hope of understanding the science behind how these compounds react in the human body and our surroundings. Based on the findings, a fictional story featuring a real-world example will be developed to help students understand the chemical reactions that the PFAS compounds undergo. The case study will be used in a chemistry course and will be evaluated for its effectiveness on student’s learning of the science at hand.
Date Posted 10-Mar-21

Creating Immersive Virtual Worlds!

Faculty Mentor Dr. Eric Bubar
Academic School School of Natural Sciences and Mathematics
Contact Information ebubar@marymount.edu
Appropriate Majors/Programs Any
Position Availability Summer 2021 (May be held on campus or remotely, as mutually agreed with the faculty mentor and as pandemic conditions require.)
Description The student(s) will learn an open source game engine (Unity). They will complete basic tutorials to explore the use of this software in creating virtual/augmented reality (VR/AR) experiences. A focus will be made on creating virtual worlds that are usable on Android/iOS cellular devices as well as the Oculus Quest 2 VR headset. Students will first create a simple virtual environment making use of premade assets available within the chosen game engine while simultaneously exploring digital asset design creation. Final project goals include the creation of a game-based forensic crime scene investigation teaching/learning experiences and/or creation of science themed puzzle escape rooms. Additional VR/AR games can be discussed/developed based on the student’s interest. Significant technical skills and/or interest in computers (preferably Windows), possession of a high-quality gaming-caliber computer with advanced GPU and an interest/familiarity with virtual reality gaming are desirable (though not strictly necessary) qualifications for interested applicants.
Date Posted 10-Mar-21

Project 1: Investigations of Companion Planting in the MU Plot Against Hunger Garden and its Implications for Increasing Pollinators;
Project 2: Investigations of Companion Planting on the Prevention of Insect Pests in the MU Plot against Hunger Garden;
Project 3: Identification of Differential Expression of SCAMP in Different Staged Breast Cancer Cells

Faculty Mentor Dr. Susan Agolini
Academic School School of Natural Sciences and Mathematics
Contact Information sagolini@marymount.edu
Appropriate Majors/Programs Biology/Biochemistry
Position Availability Summer 2021 (May be held on campus or remotely, as mutually agreed with the faculty mentor and as pandemic conditions require.)
Title
Project 1
Investigations of Companion Planting in the MU Plot Against Hunger Garden and its Implications for Increasing Pollinators
Description Project 1 This project will investigate the impact of companion planting high pollinator plants in the MU Plot Against Hunger garden. In this study, students will work closely with the faculty mentor to identify appropriate companion plants to place in the MU Plot Against Hunger garden that could attract an increase in pollinators to the vegetable garden. Students will measure the impact of the companion plant by taking daily measurements of the number of pollinator visits of both the pollinator plant and the vegetable plant. Comparisons will be made with the same vegetable plants grown in beds without the companion plants.
Title
Project 2
Investigations of Companion Planting on the Prevention of Insect Pests in the MU Plot against Hunger Garden
Description Project 2 This project will investigate the impact of companion planting in the MU Plot Against Hunger garden to decrease the appearance of insect pests . In this study, students will work closely with the faculty mentor to identify appropriate companion plants to place in the MU Plot Against Hunger garden that could decrease the number of pests that are present in the vegetable garden. Students will measure the impact of the companion plant by taking daily measurements of the number of pests seen on or near the vegetable plant. Comparisons will be made with the same vegetable plants grown in beds without the companion plants.
Title
Project 3
Identification of differential expression of SCAMP in different staged Breast Cancer Cells
Description Project 3 In this project students will study the levels of expression of various SCAMPs (Secretory Carrier Membrane Proteins) in breast cell cultures that are at various stages of transformation. Students will need to be available from 9am -5pm during the course of the 6 week research project, although they will not necessarily be in the lab the entire time.
Date Posted 10-Mar-21

Project 1: Sea Turtle Tagging and Monitoring;
Project 2: Turtle Egg Physiology – What happens inside the egg?

Faculty Mentor Dr. Todd Rimkus
Academic School School of Natural Sciences and Mathematics
Contact Information trimkus@marymount.edu
Appropriate Majors/Programs All
Position Availability Summer 2021
Project 1: (May be held on campus or remotely, as mutually agreed with the faculty mentor and as pandemic conditions require.)
Project 2: (On Campus)
Title
Project 1
Sea Turtle Tagging and Monitoring
Description
Project 1
Sea turtles are explored in Belize. We have internship opportunities and research opportunities in Belize for the summer. Being part of a research team and exploring the possibility of tagging a turtle and monitoring it’s movements as it forages and rests between nesting events.
Title
Project 2
Turtle Egg Physiology – What happens inside the egg?
Description Project 2 From trapping to hatching. We will explore the environment of these turtles and then select a site to trap several gravid female turtles. Once the turtles are obtained, we will bring them to the lab so they can lay eggs. The eggs will be incubated to hatching and we will monitor their progress with candling. Eggs will be cared for through hatching. Hatchling care and maintenance will be discussed and planned for the upcoming year.
Date Posted 10-Mar-21

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Education

On Campus Literacy Lab and Camp for Elementary Students

Faculty Mentor Dr. Ana Lado
Academic School School of Education
Contact Information ana.lado@marymount.edu
Appropriate Majors/Programs Any major.
Position Availability Summer 2021 (On Campus)
Description You will be collecting data about the development of a new project in our summer camp, a Literacy Lab. The camp will run July 12th – 23rd. You will have choices. 1) You can work before camp begins or during the camp. 2) You can choose to work directly with children along with other MU students, to work with individual campers, or work directly with Dr. Lado and a graduate student. We will be exploring information about what works, why and how it works, and ways to improve what does not work.
Date Posted 10-Mar-21

Interview Data – How to begin making sense of it

Faculty Mentor Dr. Jessica Marotta
Academic School School of Education
Contact Information jmarotta@marymount.edu
Appropriate Majors/Programs All – requires reading interview data on teaching experiences
Position Availability Summer 2021 (May be held on campus or remotely, as mutually agreed with the faculty mentor and as pandemic conditions require.)
Description For four semesters, I have interviewed students at the end of the student teaching semester to have them reflect on their experiences in the classroom, with their mentor teacher, and how their coursework prepared them for the realities of teaching. This project will include helping the researcher read through the transcribed interviews and begin the coding process to look for common themes and experiences. Coding is a process that requires reading through data, in this case student interviews, and analyzing them for categories and themes by finding common words or phrases that capture the essence of what they are explaining. Once all the interviews are read and coded, the next step is to try to pull these identified themes or categories together and analyze which ones really fit and why, as well as recognizing which ones are unique to that student and not mentioned frequently by the other students. This is one way that researchers conduct qualitative research.
Date Posted 10-Mar-21

Project 1: Relationship Between Leadership and Team Performance;
Project 2: Program Evaluation and Assessment;
Project 3: Where are all of our doctoral students from? What professions are they employed in?

Faculty Mentor Dr. Lisa Turissini
Academic School School of Education
Contact Information lturissi@maqrymount.edu
Appropriate Majors/Programs Any interested major
Position Availability Summer 2021 (May be held on campus or remotely, as mutually agreed with the faculty mentor and as pandemic conditions require.)
Title
Project 1
Relationship between leadership and team performance
Description
Project 1
Begin the process of developing an annotated bibliography of appropriate research on leadership and team building. Research styles of leadership; how teams respond to different styles of leadership; Team-building success stories in relation to leadership.
Title
Project 2
Program evaluation and assessment
Description Project 2 Research, develop, and/or evaluate rubrics specifically designed to evaluate EdD program learning outcomes to industry standards.
Title
Project 3
Where are all of our doctoral students from? What professions are they employed in?
Description Project 3 Categorize all EdD students by geographic area, profession, educational background and determine similarities and/or any trends.
Date Posted 10-Mar-21


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Business

Green Growth and Sustainable Development

Faculty Mentor Dr. Amel Ben Abdesslem
Academic School School of Business
Contact Information abenabde@marymount.edu
Appropriate Majors/Programs BBA, BS Economics, BA Economics
Position Availability Summer 2021 (May be held on campus or remotely, as mutually agreed with the faculty mentor and as pandemic conditions require.)
Description Green growth has been subject to various definitions and no standard definition has emerged. What arises from the range of definitions available is that green growth aims to foster economic growth while achieving environmental protection. More narrowly, green growth has been defined as economic growth compatible with reducing greenhouse gasses. Green growth is suggested to promote sustainable development: protecting the environment while encouraging economic growth. This broader concept of “inclusive green growth” incorporates important social sustainability goals such as enhancing human development and reducing poverty, while protecting the environment.
This project requires a student with attention to detail and willingness to learn about quantitative methods. Students will conduct a review on the literature and collect data.
Date Posted 10-Mar-21

Project 1: Current Cybersecurity Issues;
Project 2: Cyber Education for the Public Health Workforece;
Project 3: A Taxonomy of Policy Statements on 5G by Stakeholders

Faculty Mentor Dr. Donna Schaeffer
Academic School School of Technology and Innovation
Contact Information donna.schaeffer@marymount.edu
Appropriate Majors/Programs Cybersecurity
Position Availability Summer 2021 (May be held on campus or remotely, as mutually agreed with the faculty mentor and as pandemic conditions require.)
Title
Project 1
Current Cybersecurity Issues
Description Project 1 The purpose of this study will be to explore how Enterprise-level organizations are operationalizing purple team strategies. Purple teaming or purple team exercises are emerging defensive strategies organizations are implementing to improve the organization’s security posture. The manner, scope, context, timing, structure, members involved, outputs, goals, and more of the purple team strategy can differ. An initial project is needed to explore the various methodologies related to purple teaming and perhaps if the research allows or in the future, we can construct a purple team maturity model for operationalization in an organization.
Title
Project 2
Cyber Education for the Public Health Workforece
Description Project 2 This study will investigate the cybersecurity related curriculum gaps in public
health by examining the cybersecurity course offerings at institutions
accredited by the Council on Education for Public Health (CEPH). To
understand the gaps, a content analysis of the publicly available course
catalogs will be analyzed for cybersecurity-related topics and terminology. Findings from a 2019 Public Health Workforce Interest and Needs Survey (PH WINS) highlight that more than half of the public health do not have the technology skills required
to do their jobs (Sellers et al., 2019). Additionally, the information systems and
technology used to accomplish the public health mission are increasingly
under attack from cyber threats.
Title
Project 3
A Taxonomy of Policy Statements on 5G by Stakeholders
Description Project 3 I propose to create a taxonomy for the policy statements on 5G that are made by the major stakeholders. Stakeholders comprise private enterprises, e.g. Qualcomm; federal, state, and local government agencies, including the Federal Communications Commission and education boards; and associations, such as the Information Technology Industry Council. We also consider international stakeholders. We need to identify common concerns and recommendations across stakeholders and classify policy statements by technology, society, and economic issues.
Date Posted 10-Mar-21

Project 1: Credit card anomaly detection using data mining tools;
Project 2: Analyzing Job Post Prediction Using Data Mining Tools;
Project 3: The impact of COVID-19 on students’ online performance.

Faculty Mentor Dr. Faleh Alshameri
Academic School School of Technology and Innovation
Contact Information falshame@marymount.edu
Appropriate Majors/Programs Information Technology, Data Science
Position Availability Summer 2021 (May be held on campus or remotely, as mutually agreed with the faculty mentor and as pandemic conditions require.)
Title
Project 1
Credit card anomaly detection using data mining tools
Description Project 1 Use Machine learning to detect fraud in credit card transactions
Title
Project 2
Analyzing Job Post Prediction Using Data Mining Tools
Description Project 2 Analysis job post prediction using data mining tools
Title
Project 3
The impact of COVID-19 on students’ online performance.
Description Project 3 This research explores the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on college students.
Date Posted 10-Mar-21

Project 1: Teaching Children to Code;
Project 2: Using Python for Analyzing Workforce Needs

Faculty Mentor Dr. Susan Conrad
Academic School School of Technology and Innovation
Contact Information Susan Conrad
Appropriate Majors/Programs IT majors (any discipline in IT)
Position Availability Summer 2021 (May be held on campus or remotely, as mutually agreed with the faculty mentor and as pandemic conditions require.)
Title
Project 1
Teaching Children to Code
Description Project 1 This project is designed to identify strategies to engage and teach children computer skills. It will look at using a device such as a Rasberry Pi to develop coding games, robotics and puzzles. The project will research effective teaching strategies to teach children about computers focusing on children ages 5-10. This research will employ a practical component and by employing applications for children to use.
Title
Project 2
Using Python for Analyzing Workforce Needs
Description Project 2 This research will research posted jobs on internet sites involving IT skills and analyze requirements for categories of positions. It will look to map these requirements with Marymount classes to identify gaps in education for workforce readiness of Marymount students.
Date Posted 10-Mar-21

Project 1: Cybersecurity Policy Compliance During the Covid-19 Pandemic: An Empirical Study of Leadership Commitment, User Experience, and Cybersecurity Awareness Training;
Project 2: A Cross-Disciplinary Study on the Role of Cybersecurity Measures in an Electoral Process

Faculty Mentor Dr. Michelle Liu
Academic School School of Technology and Innovation
Contact Information xliu@marymount.edu
Appropriate Majors/Programs Cybersecurity
Position Availability Summer 2021 (May be held on campus or remotely, as mutually agreed with the faculty mentor and as pandemic conditions require.)
Title
Project 1
Cybersecurity Policy Compliance During the Covid-19 Pandemic: An Empirical Study of Leadership Commitment, User Experience, and Cybersecurity Awareness Training
Description Project 1 Social engineering attacks facilitated by the Internet and Social Media Networks combined with lack of awareness and compliance with organizational security policies are frequently cited as one of the greatest cybersecurity concerns in organizations today. These concerns are exacerbated in the current environment, where the Covid-19 pandemic has significantly increased the prevalence of telework and associated remote access and collaborative technologies. As the human component of information systems is a potentially high impact target of cyberattacks, more and more organizations have attempted to address the threat using a number of means including security access control, threat intelligence hunting, and risk assessment and mitigation. However, even the most robust technical controls have limits. Addressing the threat also requires providing training that effectively informs end users of security policies, threats and risks facing the organizations. This empirical study seeks to assess the effectiveness of organizations’ implementation of the security awareness training at influencing user behaviors. The student researcher will work with the faculty to design a survey study to evaluate the influence of security awareness training and security culture on security policy compliance via leadership prerogative. The ultimate goal of this study is to gain a better understanding of multi-faceted factors including organization culture and user experiences of security measures implemented in workplace, and their impacts on an end user’s intention to support or undermine security policy goals.
Title
Project 2
A Cross-Disciplinary Study on the Role of Cybersecurity Measures in an Electoral Process
Description Project 2 The use of new technology enables a higher degree of efficiency and accuracy in an electoral process including electoral planning, voting registers and results reporting. However, even with careful planning and management, it also introduces cybersecurity risks which might significantly damage public trust in election outcomes and voters’ confidence. Presently, there is no particular way of addressing this lack of voters’ trust. This study attempts to examine this phenomenon from a cross-disciplinary lens by exploring how cybersecurity measures could by utilized to better fulfill the requirement of people, democracy, and society. In this exploratory study, the researchers will examine voting systems in the U.S., conduct historical overviews, and investigate how the voting systems could conform to new technology to protect the elections. The study will also determine the potential threats actors interfering in elections, the types of cyberattacks the actors use to affect election integrity, and the reasons that inspire them to disrupt the traditional selection processes. This study aims to illuminate how elections can be protected by suggesting the best cybersecurity measures that could be used to maintain voters’ trust. The student researcher will perform a qualitative research design and collect data by interviewing election practitioners and cybersecurity experts. The final product of this project is an overarching cybersecurity best practices that can be used to assess and manage cybersecurity risk in the electoral cycle.
Date Posted 10-Mar-21

Role of Distance in Determining Utilization of Dental Services in the Emergency Departments – a Review of Literature

Faculty Mentor Dr. Uma Kelekar
Academic School School of Business
Contact Information ukelekar@marymount.edu
Appropriate Majors/Programs Healthcare Management, Health Education and Promotion, Geography
Position Availability Summer 2021 (May be held on campus or remotely, as mutually agreed with the faculty mentor and as pandemic conditions require.)
Description Oral health disparities are prevalent and clearly evident through Emergency Department (ED) utilization for dental services by certain sub-populations in the United States. While several studies have examined association between socio-economic factors and use of dental services in EDs, very few have explored the role physical distance plays in determining ED utilization for non-traumatic dental conditions (NTDCs).
Through this project, the student will have an opportunity to review the scholarly literature that examines the role of distance in utilizing dental services in the emergency departments in the United States. The project will require the student to survey the literature and document the findings of studies that have examined the role of distance in determining how people utilize medical or dental services in the Emergency Departments. Do people travel less for specific types of services such as dental as opposed to other medical services? Are there heterogeneities across populations in distance traveled based on their race, ethnicity or age? In addition, the student will have an opportunity to work with a secondary dataset and generate maps to visualize ED use for the state of Maryland.
Date Posted 10-Mar-21


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Health-Related

The Lived Experience of Acute Care Nurses During the Covid Pandemic

Faculty Mentor Dr. Judith Rogers Fruiterman
Academic School Malek School of Nursing
Contact Information jrogers_@marymount.edu
Appropriate Majors/Programs Nursing
Position Availability Summer 2021 (May be held on campus or remotely, as mutually agreed with the faculty mentor and as pandemic conditions require.)
Description My doctoral dissertation examined the lived experience of nurses who cared for victims of the World Trade Center Attack on September 11. My intent was to consider how participating in this response crafted the nurse’s perception of their work, their value systems, their future careers and their recommendations for nursing research. Above all, I believed the body of nursing knowledge needed to capture the narratives of these exceptional individuals who faced this extraordinary moment in history. I am launching a research project to do the same for our front line nurses who work in acute care as they experience the challenges of this pandemic. I think their stories will be telling and imperative for the knowledge of future nurses. My project will be a Phenomenologic Qualitative study.
Date Posted 10-Mar-21

Mother-infant interaction in U.S. Immigrant Families

Faculty Mentor Dr. Linda Cote-Reilly
Academic School School of Social and Behavioral Sciences
Contact Information lcote@marymount.edu
Appropriate Majors/Programs Psychology majors
Position Availability Summer 2021 (May be held on campus or remotely, as mutually agreed with the faculty mentor and as pandemic conditions require.)
Description Student will assist Dr. Cote-Reilly with literature review, data analysis, research report writing with her research on mother-infant interaction in South American, Japanese American, and Korean American immigrant families. The focus will be on children’s language development or mother-infant socioemotional interaction. All data are collected and ready to be analyzed and written up for publication; student has potential to be a co-author on a publication.
Date Posted 10-Mar-21

Postpartum Healthcare Policies: Examining access and availability of post-pregnancy care

Faculty Mentor Dr. Megan McFarlane
Academic School School of Social and Behavioral Sciences
Contact Information mmcfarla@marymount.edu
Appropriate Majors/Programs Open to all majors, undergraduate and graduate students
Position Availability Summer 2021 (May be held on campus or remotely, as mutually agreed with the faculty mentor and as pandemic conditions require.)
Description Recently, a few prominent athletes and celebrities have publicly discussed their experience with diastasic recti (DR), or abdominal separation experienced by about two-thirds of pregnant women. Athletes such as Stephanie Bruce (Olympic marathoner), Alyssia Montano (Olympic 800m runner), and Morgan Miller (U.S. beach volleyball player) have posted about their experiences with DR, including Alyssia Montano’s videos of her physical therapy and then subsequent reconstructive surgery. Diastasic recti, if untreated, can lead to pelvic floor issues, back pain, and urinary incontinence, yet many insurance programs do not cover its treatment, and many women are not given information about it or know where to go for treatment. In this project, I am looking for a student to assist me with interviews with physical therapists who specialize in DR, as well as preparing, distributing, collecting, and analyzing results from a survey of DR patients’ experiences navigating health insurance and the healthcare systems as it relates to treating their DR. The student may also assist with analyzing the findings from the research and writing them up in a journal article.
Date Posted 10-Mar-21

Exploring Civic Engagement Among Registered Nurses

Faculty Mentor Dr. Terri Gaffney
Academic School Malek School of Nursing
Contact Information tgaffney@marymount.edu
Appropriate Majors/Programs Nursing
Position Availability Summer 2021 (May be held on campus or remotely, as mutually agreed with the faculty mentor and as pandemic conditions require.)
Description Project 1- Conduct focus groups, analyze data, and prepare a manuscript based on civic engagement among registered nurses. Civic engagement involves individual and collective actions designed to identify and address issues of public concern (APA, 2020). Influencing and shaping health policy is central to nurses’ work, yet it is also one of the least actualized roles of nursing (Salvage & White, 2019). In order to influence policy development, one must demonstrate political astuteness and civic skills such as voting, communicating with elected officials, attending and or speaking at public policy gatherings, working as a volunteer for an elected official, monetary contributions to campaigns, serving as an elected official and working with others in the community on policy initiatives. Although nurses have been encouraged to participate civically, the literature in this area is limited.
Date Posted 10-Mar-21

Palliative Care – a Comparative Analysis of the United States and European countries

Faculty Mentor Dr. Uma Kelekar
Academic School School of Business
Contact Information ukelekar@marymount.edu
Appropriate Majors/Programs Healthcare Management, Health Education and Promotion, Geography
Position Availability Summer 2021 (May be held on campus or remotely, as mutually agreed with the faculty mentor and as pandemic conditions require.)
Description The Center to Advance Palliative Care (CAPC) defines palliative care as “specialized medical care for people with serious illnesses. Palliative care is focused on providing patients with relief of symptoms, pain and stress of a serious illness”. As a part of the study, the researchers will undertake a comparative analysis of the infrastructure of palliative care available in the United States and a few selected European countries. In addition to the types of palliative care organizations, the available financing and reimbursement mechanisms along with its affordability to users will be researched. The student will have the opportunity to conduct a literature review and engage in qualitative research. Specifically, the student will help in identifying and preparing an interview guide for stakeholders including policy and healthcare finance experts, as well as leaders of healthcare organizations.
Date Posted 10-Mar-21

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