Medical Sciences M.S. Course Descriptions

MSMS 500 Human Gross Anatomy, Embryology, and Imaging

This course consists of a detailed study of the normal structure, development, and organization of the human body. This course takes a regional approach, rather than a systemic approach to Human Gross Anatomy, Embryology & Imaging and is distributed into three block contents. Gross structures are studied in the laboratory or virtual lab setting by specimen prosection and demonstration. The radiology component of Gross Anatomy serves as the introduction to radiology and prepares the student for further development. Lectures stress the contribution of developmental events to gross anatomical organization and the correlation of this organization with clinically relevant conditions. The course is delivered in the form of recorded lectures with accompanying in class-sessions using the flipped classroom model. (9)

MSMS 501/502 Physiology I and II

These are two courses, one-semester-long each, presented to medical and graduate students in their first year. The courses are delivered in the form of recorded lectures with accompanying in class-sessions using the flipped classroom model, small Group Discussions, Labs, and examinations. Physiology is organized in a systems-based fashion to teach the normal function of the body and how the systems work. For Physiology I, cell and muscle, cardiovascular, and respiratory systems are covered. For Physiology II, renal and acid-base balance, gastrointestinal, and endocrinology/reproduction are the included topics. The course is taught in a clinical based format highlighting pathologies and abnormal function of the body. (4 each)

MSMS 503/504 Medical Biochemistry I and II

The courses are divided in the following units: Structural and functional relationships of proteins, Energy generation and storage from carbohydrate metabolism, Energy Generation and storage from lipid metabolism, Nitrogen metabolism, Gene expression and control, and Medical Genetics. In these courses, medical aspects are emphasized to build up the necessary background for future application in other basic sciences and clinical courses. The courses are delivered in the form of recorded lectures with accompanying in class-sessions using the flipped classroom model, together with small group discussions of clinical cases. One of the main intentions of the small group discussions is for the medical students to apply the biochemical concepts learned in lectures to understand the molecular basis of a given disease. (5 each)

MSMS 505 Microbiology

This course covers the most common pathogens involved in infectious diseases and their characteristics. It includes basic concepts of Immunology, Virology, Mycology, Bacteriology and Parasitology. The course is delivered in the form of recorded lectures with accompanying in class-sessions using the flipped classroom model. (4)

MSMS 506 Neuroscience

The Neuroscience course is designed to give students a foundational knowledge of the human central nervous system that they will use when learning how to diagnose and treat neurological disorders. The course provides students with important principles of neurological function, from cellular and molecular mechanisms of neural communication to the organization and function of sensory and motor systems and higher cognitive function. Students will take virtual or wet-laboratories, clinical correlations and demonstrate mastery of the neurological exam to reinforce knowledge of brain structure and strengthen skills to understand the human nervous system. The course is delivered in the form of recorded lectures with accompanying in class-sessions using the flipped classroom model. (5)

MSMS 507 Histology and Cell Biology

This course focuses on the study of the different aspects of the internal structure of cells, tissues, and organs in the human body, presenting a comprehensive survey of many of their complex interrelationships. Lectures discuss the cytoarchitecture, clinical correlations are utilized to stress histological changes and their impact on health, and virtual laboratory sessions detail interactive work with slides that show normal and metaplastic specimens. The course is delivered in the form of recorded lectures with accompanying in class-sessions using the flipped classroom model. (4)

MSMS 508 Medical Ethics

This course is scheduled as a block of up to 18 contact hours with various instructors and professionals. The goal is to provide didactic experiences for graduate students in specific areas within the field of medical ethics. The need for these experiences stems from the recognition that ethical dilemmas are inherent in medical care. The students will develop an understanding of the principles of medical ethics and a system of ethical reasoning that will result in consistent decisions. The didactic activities will include presentations of clinical cases which have been selected to represent ethical dilemmas similar to those that are likely encountered in real life. Activities include a combination of lectures, assigned readings and small group case discussions covering different subjects within the four main areas of medical ethics, namely: ethical issues of scientific research, ethical issues of the doctor-patient relationship, beginning-of-life and end-of-life ethical issues. (1)

MSMS 509 Interprofessional Perspectives in Health Disparities

This course is designed to provide a general overview of gaps in health outcomes associated with health disparities. A special emphasis will be given to the social determinants of health such as race/ethnicity, social class, socioeconomic status, sex, sexuality, nationality and migration status. The course will focus on the impact of health disparities’ impact at multiple system’s levels (e.g. Individual, patient-clinician, healthcare system, etc.). (1)