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Dr. Amy Scott-Douglass
Assistant Professor of English
Contact Information

Gailhac 2005
(703) 284-1576

Academic Credentials

B.A., M.A. English and M.A. Theatre, Bowling Green State University
Ph.D., University of Oklahoma
 

Teaching Areas:

  • Medieval and Early Modern British and Continental Literature
  • Writing about the Arts
  • Drama and Film
Research Interests:
  • 17th-century British Literature
  • Women’s Literary History
  • Adaptations of Shakespeare
  • Prison Writing and Theatre

Dr. Amy Scott-Douglass teaches courses in medieval and early modern literature, and in composition, drama, and film. In her classes, Dr. Scott-Douglass focuses on student/professor dialogue and strives to provide opportunities for experiential learning, especially student field trips to theatres, museums, and archival libraries in Washington, DC. She also enjoys working with students who have interests in theatre arts outreach and study abroad.

Dr. Scott-Douglass’s book, Shakespeare Inside: The Bard Behind Bars (Continuum, 2007), is a study of Shakespeare prison programs in the United States. She also authored the “Theater” section of Shakespeares after Shakespeare: An Encyclopedia of the Bard in Mass Media and Popular Culture (Greenwood, 2006), discussing more than 100 original plays based upon Shakespeare and written in the last hundred years. She has published several essays and articles on early modern women authors, and film and stage adaptations of Renaissance drama.

Dr. Scott-Douglass’s current projects-in-process include a monograph on women’s literary history that examines readers’ marginalia in books by English women authors who wrote and published in England from 1375-1700; a collection of essays on adaptations of Shakespeare on stage, film, television, and the Internet; and encyclopedia essays and articles on race, gender, and religion in Shakespeare children’s books from 1807-2004, Shakespeare citations in contemporary popular films, and readers’ marginalia as a form of authorship in Quaker and Puritan texts from 1657-1696.