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New Student Advising and Registration (NSTAR)


STEP 1: DISCOVER (DSC 101)

DSC 101 First-Year Seminar Fall 2014

This 3-credit course is one of your University requirements. University requirements are common elements of every student’s Marymount education, no matter what their major.

DSC 101 is an inquiry course (INQ). You will take three additional INQ courses in your major, as you progress through your program of study here at Marymount. In your INQ courses you will actively engage in investigating questions and problems, some of which have no one answer. DSC 101 helps you to begin to develop the skills and abilities to do this, while helping you make the transition from high school to college and sharpen your academic skills for success at Marymount.

Each section of DSC 101 has a theme which is selected by the course instructor, but in all sections you will:

  • Learn how to engage questions and answer them (inquiry learning)
  • Locate and use information through the Internet, library, and field trips
  • Write and make oral presentations about a variety of topics
  • Get connected with Marymount resources that can help and support you
  • Explore your interests and skills, and begin to create an electronic portfolio that will be yours for your 4 years of college

Selecting Your DSC 101 First-year Seminar
You choose which one of the DSC 101 sections listed below you want to take (each has a limited amount of space). You may also browse DSC 101 Sections by Interest Area to find sections organized by broad themes. This may help narrow your search for a section theme that interests you.


Section Theme Day/Time Main Campus Ballston Center
A 2014 U.S. Senate Elections T/F
11:00 – 12:15

X

 
B I Can Write A Grant T/F
9:30 - 10:45

X

C Going Green T/F
2 - 3:15

X

D Learn to Play the Acoustic Guitar T/F
2 - 3:15

X

E We Are What We Eat: The Sociology of Food T/F
2 - 3:15

X

 
F Inventing Your Own Mobile Apps T/F
11:45 - 1:00

X

G TBA T/F
1:15 - 2:30

X

H Saving the Environment: The Less Than Glamorous Reality of What It Takes T/F
11 - 12:15

X

 
I The Power of Positive: Exploring Positive Psychology T/F
11 - 12:15

X

J Movie Science! T/F
11 - 12:15
X  
K Ambassadors in Training: Encountering the Middle East & North Africa around Washington DC T/F
9:30 - 10:45
X
M Global Issues and Volunteerism M/TH
9:30 - 10:45
X
N Hobbits, Heroes and Hunger Games: Investigating the Hidden Order of Societies Real and Imagined T/F
2 - 3:15
X
O Messages that Matter: Developing Interpersonal Communication Skills M/TH
11 - 12:15
X
P How Is My Stock Market Investment Doing? M/TH
1:15 - 2:30

X

Q TBA M/TH
10:30 - 11:45

X

R Fashion Lifestyle and Culture M/Th
2 - 3:15
X  
S Stop in the Name of the Law! M/TH
2 - 3:15
X
T TBA M/TH
3:30 - 4:45
X
U Moral Panic: Are You a Zombie or Vampire? M/TH
3:30 - 4:45
X
V Exploring You: The Next Generation of Leaders Monday
9:30 - 12:15
X
W Who Do We Remember? What Do We Preserve? Thursday
9:30 - 12:15
X


Once you have reviewed the DSC101 courses and have found some that you are interested in taking, you may move on to the next step:

>> STEP 2: Directed Self-Placement (DSP)





DSC 101 section A
2014 U. S. Senate Elections

How will voters decide which party will control the Senate? This November 33 Senate races will help determine whether Democrats or Republicans set the agenda for the end of the Obama era. We will analyze each match-up by studying the issues, participating in campaign events, evaluating pundits and elections forcasts. We’ll celebrate with an Election Day event on campus.

Instructor: Professor Chad Rector

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DSC 101 section B
I Can Write A Grant

We will explore ways people in and around Marymount contribute to society. The principle task is to work in student groups and to write a grant for one local Nongovernmental Organization (NGO). Each group will volunteer at an organization and together write an 8 page response to a Request For Proposals (RFP). The idea is to make a good case for awarding yours $3,000. Other students at MU will evaluate them and select one so we can personally deliver the award. Another group task is to survey students, faculty, or staff about their participation in NGOs and charities and to report our findings. Finally, we make video presentations about ourselves, our volunteering, working, studying, and field trips.

Instructor: Professor Ana Lado

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DSC 101 section C
Going Green

Interested in protecting the environment? In this course you will look at ways to lessen our impact on the environment and promote sustainability. We will visit different organizations and hear from experts in government, business, and nonprofit organizations as we explore current “green” issues. We will also talk about how sustainability impacts all career fields.

Instructor: Professors Nancy Furlow

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DSC 101 section D
Learn to Play Acoustic Guitar

Have you always wanted to learn to play the guitar? Now’s your chance! Students in this course will explore a variety of musical genres from folk to classical for the acoustic guitar. Classes will vary in structure from learning about and playing the guitar to researching and presenting on influential musicians. The culminating experience has the class organize and host an event on campus. Access to an acoustical guitar for class and personal study is required (if you do not have a guitar but really want to take this class, we can help you get one!).

Instructor: Professor Michael Nordvall

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DSC 101 section E
We Are What We Eat: The Sociology of Food

Have you ever wondered how our culture influences trends in diet, exercise, obesity and health? Why do you like cake and hate broccoli? Does the rise of McDonalds tell us something about our social values? What does it say about you when you order a salad on the first date? This semester we will examine how food choices are influenced by economics, gender, and the environment, and how food choices influence health. Through asking good questions -- and searching for answers -- you will see how food has shaped -- and continues to shape -- our culture.

Instructors: Professors Stephanie Ellis & Liane Summerfield

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DSC 101 section F
Inventing Your Own Mobile Apps

In this course, you will learn how to create your own mobile applications (known as Mobile Apps) using MIT Apps Inventor, a visual, web-based programming environment. You will access the world of mobile services and applications as producers and inventors, not just consumers. Through hands on laboratory work and inquiry-based individual and group projects, you will create entertaining and socially useful apps that can be shared with friends and family. In addition to learning to program and how to become better problem solvers, this course also allows you to explore the exciting world of information technology from the perspective of mobile computing and its increasingly important effect on society. Previous programming experience is not required.

Instructor: Professor Michelle Liu

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DSC 101 section G
To Be Announced

Instructor: To Be Announced

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DSC 101 section H
Saving the Environment: The Less Than Glamourous Reality of What it Takes

Do you love dolphins? Do you recycle? Do you hug trees? Then this course may not be for you. Sorry. However, we’ll be looking at how 21st Century scientists, politicians, and business-people try to minimize their impacts on the environment. Prepare to question your ideas on what it means to be green.

Instructor: Professor Peter Redding

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DSC 101 section I
The Power of Positive: Exploring Positive Psychology

Explore the innovative field of positive psychology in terms of human attitudes and behaviors. You will self-reflect as well as study about how hopefulness, optimism, and kindness impact human resilience throughout the lifespan. You will focus on the strengths and assets that have been identified to foster human flourishing, with emphasis on what helps people not only survive, but thrive.

Instructor: Professor Tammy Davis

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DSC 101 section J
Movie Science!

Science is a firmly engrained aspect of modern society. In this course we will study how science and technology are integral aspects of entertainment. Could you actually build crime-fighting super-armor? How dangerous is life on the International Space Station? Is our planet in danger of being destroyed by our activities and could society settle another one before this happens? In POP Physics we will pose these questions (amongst others!) and explore how well entertainment does in making science approachable, fun AND accurate!

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DSC 101 section K
Ambassadors in Training: Encountering the Middle East & North Africa Around Washington, D.C.

Marymount brags about its “capital location,” and we’ll put that boast to the test. What can we discover about the strategically located region known as the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) here, without hopping on a jet?

In this course, we’ll learn with and from each other as we explore the region’s many cultural resources. Field trips and “passport assignments” will take you to embassies, think tanks, museums, restaurants, and other venues. You may even dance the dabka. Writing WordPress blog posts and delivering “minute presentations,” you’ll practice research and communication skills essential for your future as a Marymount student and a global citizen/diplomat. Marhaba and welcome!

Instructor: Professor Sylvia Whitman

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DSC 101 section M
Global Issues and Volunteerism

Interested in learning about global social and health issues? In this course you will examine global issues that confront the East and West. You will explore and visit local and international volunteer service organizations to better understand their activities and roles. Field trips and videos will enhance your classroom experiences.

Instructor: Professor Fatma Youssef

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DSC 101 section N
Hobbits, Heroes and Hunger Games: Investigating the Hidden Order of Societies Real and Imagined.

For Katniss Everdeen, the Capitol provides a pretty clear incentive for hunting down her competition in the Hunger Games: kill or be killed. Fantasy and science fiction portray extreme worlds, but these imaginary societies operate on principles remarkably similar to those that govern our lives in the "real world." Characters in these stories face a variety of incentives that influence their actions. What motivates you? How does the state shape your choices? Moving from hobbits in Middle-earth to millennials in 21st-century America, this course investigates how institutions and incentives affect individual behavior.

Instructor: Professor Brian Hollar

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DSC 101 section O
Messages that Matter: Developing Interpersonal Communication Skills

Want to become a better communicator with friends, family, roommates, and faculty? Join us as we explore communication as it occurs in two-personal and small group settings. Learn about ways to use verbal and nonverbal communication to improve relationships and derive maximum social rewards. This interactive class will provide the opportunity for lively discussion, self-reflection, group work, and off-campus explorations all focused on interpersonal behavior.

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DSC 101 section P
How Is My Stock Market Investment Doing?

Learn about the basic operation of the stock market. You will evaluate the overall performance of the stock market by analyzing the three major stock market indexes. You will create your own investment portfolio, using virtual dollars, and apply recommended investment strategies in shaping your investment decisions.

Instructor: Professor Teresia Wansi

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DSC 101 section Q
To Be Announced

Instructor: To Be Announced

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DSC 101 section R
Fashion Lifestyle and Culture

What you wear depends on where you live. What do American blue jeans, Indian saris, and Arabian dishdashas reveal about the cultures that produced them? In this course we “travel the world” to understand the interplay of fashion and economics, arts, science, and history.

Instructor: Professor Yan Beal

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DSC 101 section S
Stop in the Name of the Law

Law and Order fans this may be your course! Learn about crime, punishment and what the heck habeus corpus means.

Instructor: Professor Scott Spencer

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DSC 101 section T
To Be Announced

Instructor: To Be Announced

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DSC 101 section U
Moral Panic: Are You a Zombie or Vampire?

Are you a Zombie or a Vampire in your ethical decision making process? Do you have a "one-track" mind when it comes to making ethical choices, or do you thirst for a clear and practical way through an ethical dilemma? Werewolves need not apply, as we begin to look at just what moral panic is through history, the arts, and practical case studies. Does the infection of moral panic exist in our modern world?

Instructor: Professor Louis Frisenda

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DSC 101 section V
Exploring You: The Next Generation of Leaders

Are you the first person in your family to go to college? If so, this course is for you! Join us as you explore your important role in the Marymount and global community. This interactive class will provide the opportunity for lively discussion, self-reflection, group work, and off-campus exploration all focused on leadership.

Instructors: Professors Anne Aichele & Corri Sullivan

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DSC 101 section W
Who Do We Remember? What Do We Preserve?

The public must decide what persons we memorialize and what buildings we preserve. How should we, as good citizens and critical thinkers, decide who we remember and who we forget—what we restore and what we destroy? How precisely should we remember the past, and what aspects of the past do we leave out of our memorials and museums? In this seminar, we will ponder these questions of public memory and historic preservation through inquiry based learning methods. We will explore Washington, D.C., Arlington, and Alexandria, an area famous for its statues, monuments, museums, historic homes, and public spaces. We will also investigate, research, document, and reclaim the neglected cemetery on Marymount’s grounds, to develop our research skills and analytical powers, to perform a service to the community, and to do justice to the ordinary folks interred there and forgotten. This innovative course will get students thinking—and get them a little dirty!

Instructors: Professors Bob Meden & Patrick Mullins

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Questions?

See the NSTAR FAQ


Contact Us

Orientation Office
(800) 548-7638 ext. 5706
(703) 284-5706
orientation@marymount.edu

Center for Teaching & Learning
(703) 526-6935
firstyear@marymount.edu