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Course Descriptions

HI 203 Western Civilization I
A study of the rise and contribution of the dominant ancient civilizations, the medieval Christian heritage, and the feudal way of life. Liberal Arts Core/University Requirements Designation: ETH, GP, HI-1. (3)

HI 204 Western Civilization II
A study of the forces that shape the modern world and of transcendent problems of the contemporary age. The course emphasizes the development of Western civilization. Liberal Arts Core/University Requirements Designation: ETH, GP, HI-1. (3)

HI 210 History of the United States to 1877
A survey of the history of the United States from the Colonial period to 1877 with emphasis on colonial origins, the struggle for independence, the continuing struggle to implement and preserve the principles and government structure of a democratic republic. Major economic, cultural, and social changes also are examined. Liberal Arts Core/University Requirements Designation: ETH, GP, HI-1. (3)

HI 211 History of the United States since 1877
A survey of the history of the United States from the Reconstruction period to the present with emphasis on foreign relations, politics, economics, and cultural and social change. Liberal Arts Core/University Requirements Designation: ETH, GP, HI-1. (3)

HI 214 Introduction to World History
Provides an overview of world history, including an introduction to the origin and development of Indian, Arabic, Chinese, African, and European American societies and their political, cultural, social, and economic traditions. (3)

HI 250 Research and Writing
An introduction to the sources and methods used in historical research and writing. Prerequisite: EN 102. Liberal Arts Core/University Requirements Designation: INQ, WI. (3)

HI 295 Introduction to Public History
Surveys major approaches to the production and presentation of history in the public (nonacademic) sphere. Topics include, but are not limited to, the following: genealogy, oral history, museum exhibitions, historic preservation, heritage tourism, archival management, the Internet, documentary films, and the culture "wars." Field trips, class projects, and assignments provide practical skills and experiences, while guest speakers address career opportunities and professional concerns. (3)

HI 304 History of the British Isles: Iron Age to 1603
This course examines the major political, socioeconomic, intellectual, and religious developments in the British Isles (including Ireland, Scotland, and Wales) up to the death of Queen Elizabeth I. Specific areas examined include the indigenous Celtic populations, the Roman and Anglo-Saxon conquests, the formation of the Anglo-Norman kingdom, and the Tudor monarchy. It is recommended that students take HI 203 before taking this course. (3)

HI 305 History of the British Isles: 1603 to the Present
Examines the major political, socioeconomic, intellectual, and religious developments in the British Isles (including Ireland, Scotland, and Wales) from the death of Queen Elizabeth I to the reign of Queen Elizabeth II. Specific areas examined include the English Civil War, the Hanoverians, the Industrial Revolution, the emergence of modern social classes, Victorian England, and Britain in the 21st century. Prerequisite: HI 203 or HI 204. (3)

HI 310 Modern European History: 1815-1914
An examination of the European civilization from the Congress of Vienna through World War I. The issues of war, imperialism, and power are studied in the context of the emerging nation states. Prerequisite: HI 203 or HI 204. Liberal Arts Core/University Requirements Designation: GP, HI-2. (3)

HI 311 Modern European History: 1914 to the Present
An examination of 20th-century European civilization with a focus on the rise of communism, fascism, Nazism; economic developments and markets; causes and results of war; and the collapse of European colonialism. Prerequisite: HI 203 or HI 204. Liberal Arts Core/University Requirements Designation: GP, HI-2. (3)

HI 315 Modern French History: 1789 to the Present
A study of the political, economic, social, and cultural history of France from the French Revolution to the present. The course charts France’s search for security through the Fifth Republic and examines the contemporary role of France in Europe and the European Community. Prerequisite: HI 203 or HI 204. (3)

HI 322 Colonial and Revolutionary America
A study of colonial American society from 1607 to 1789, beginning with the development of English colonies in North America and ending with the establishment of an independent and constitutional government. The course examines the social, economic, and political growth of the colonies leading to the American Revolution and proceeds on to the problems of creating a new nation. Prerequisite: HI 210. Liberal Arts Core/University Requirements Designation: HI-2, INQ, WI. (3)

HI 323 The Early National Period and the Jacksonian Era
An examination of the major themes in United States history from the ratification of the Constitution through the events of the Mexican-American War. The course emphasizes the development of a political nation, the creation of a market economy, and the changing characteristics of the developing society. Prerequisite: HI 210. Liberal Arts Core/University Requirements Designation: HI-2. (3)

HI 325A-F Topics in American History
Provides an opportunity for students to study a specific group, region, or theme in American history. Subjects vary from semester to semester and are designated as: HI 325A Women in the United States; HI 325B Immigrants and Ethnicity; HI 325C The Frontier; HI 325D Virginia and the Old South. HI 325E and HI 325F have not been designated yet. Prerequisite for HI 325A and HI 325B: HI 210 or HI 211. Prerequisite for HI 325C and HI 325D: HI 210. Liberal Arts Core/University Requirements Designation for HI 325C and HI 325D: HI-2. (3)

HI 330 The United States: Civil War and Reconstruction
A study of the political, economic, social, and cultural history of the United States leading to the secession and Civil War from 1861 to 1865, and an examination of the policies of Reconstruction in the decades following the war. Prerequisite: HI 210. (3)

HI 332 American Foreign Policy
A history of the policies of the United States toward other governments and an analysis of the principal factors to be considered in formulating and executing American foreign policy. Prerequisites: POL 220 or permission of instructor. (3)

HI 345 The Gilded Age and the Progressive Era
Examines the social, political, economic, and cultural changes that occurred in the United States from the end of Reconstruction through World War I. Topics include urbanization, consumerism, immigration, political machines, the rise of Big Business, social reform, Populism, Progressivism, and Imperialism. It is recommended that students take HI 211 before taking this course. Liberal Arts Core/University Requirements Designation: HI-2. (3)

HI 350 Modern United States History
Focuses on the development of the United States since World War I. Among the issues examined are the United States as a world power, the development of popular culture, and the civil rights movement. It is recommended that students take HI 211 before taking this course. Liberal Arts Core/University Requirements Designation: GP, HI-2. (3)

HI 360 Ancient Greece and Rome
A study of the political, socioeconomic, and cultural developments of ancient Greece and the Roman Empire. The course focuses on the development of the Greek polis; the rise, expansion, and collapse of the Roman Republic; and the legacy that these civilizations left to European history. It is recommended that students take HI 203 before taking this course. (3)

HI 365 History of Medieval Europe
Covers topics in medieval European history from the end of the Roman World to the transitional period of the 15th century. The study includes an examination of the Church-State relations, the development of Christian culture, and the institution of feudalism. It is recommended that students take HI 203 before taking this course. (3)

HI 375 The Renaissance and the Reformation
A study of topics in European history from the end of the medieval period to the Thirty Years War. The course examines the cultural contributions of the Italian Renaissance, the major events of the Catholic and Protestant Reformations, and the wars of religion. It is recommended that students take HI 203 before taking this course. (3)

HI 380 The History of Early Modern Europe
Traces the major intellectual and political trends in European history from the Thirty Years War to the fall of Napoleon. Specific areas examined include Royal Absolutism, the Scientific Revolution, the Enlightenment, and the French Revolution. Prerequisite: HI 203 or HI 204. (3)

HI 385 Approaches to Teaching Secondary History and Social Science
Prepares the student to teach History and Social Science at the secondary level by integrating content mastery with effective pedagogical strategies. Field experience: 20 hours. Prerequisites: ED 250 and ED 327S. (3)

HI 400 Internship
Senior students register for an internship with a service or research agency in the Washington metropolitan area. The internship is monitored by the supervising professor and a representative of the cooperating agency. Prerequisites: senior status and a grade point average of 2.5 in major courses. Liberal Arts Core/University Requirements Designation: EXP. (3-6)

HI 420 Senior Seminar
An examination of interpretations and arguments regarding the purpose and meaning of history. The seminar aims to develop a critical understanding of the discipline of history required for continued and coherent study, and to challenge the student to develop an analytical interpretation of historical events. Offered spring semester only. Prerequisites: a grade of C or better in HI 250 or its equivalent or permission of instructor, and EN 102. Liberal Arts Core/University Requirements Designation: INQ, WI. (3)

HI 421 Project
An investigation of a selected topic in the emphasis discipline. The project is intended to demonstrate a student’s ability to conduct independent research and present the results in writing of commendable quality. Prerequisite: consent of the dean of Arts and Sciences. (3)