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Academics

Criminal Justice Administration & Policy

Course Descriptions

CJ 500 Foundations of Criminal Justice Administration
An application of organization and administration theories to the criminal justice system. This course uses an interactionist perspective of administration to facilitate understanding of criminal justice organizations. The course perspective moves away from the individual offender and toward the self-generating effects of interlocking systems operating in a complex environment of interests. It also provides students with fundamental concepts of civil law as reflected in the law of civil procedure, the civil law court system, and areas of civil liability for criminal justice practitioners. Prerequisite: admission to the M.A. in Criminal Justice Administration and Policy program. (3)

CJ 501 Victims of Interpersonal Violence
An examination of contemporary victimology as it relates to physical violence in personal relationships. The course’s emphasis on current theory and practice with respect to violent behavior and governmental and organizational treatment of victims will assist students in becoming aware of victims’ unique plight in American society. This course examines physical violence in American families, including spouse, child, and elder abuse, and other forms of interpersonal harm. (3)

CJ 504 Research Methods in Criminal Justice
Provides an introduction to the basic methods, techniques, and procedures of social science research. Qualitative and quantitative methods, such as survey research, experiments, observational/field work, program evaluation, and interview approaches appropriate to the study of criminal justice will be examined. The course also addresses methods of inquiry, causality, sampling, research instrument design, data collection, coding, ethics, and statistics. Prerequisite: admission to the M.A. in Criminal Justice Administration and Policy program. (3)

CJ 507 Juvenile Justice
An advanced examination of the history and purpose of the juvenile justice system that includes the role of the U.S. Supreme Court. The course also evaluates the extent and nature of juvenile delinquency in contemporary America; examines theoretical explanations of juvenile delinquency; and addresses the physical, emotional, and societal problems faced by juveniles today. Students will also study the treatment and punishment of juvenile offenders using cutting-edge research. (Also listed as SOC 507.) (3)

CJ 511 Current Controversies in Corrections
Provides an examination of contemporary issues in corrections, such as the realities of prison life, the role of courts in the correctional process, the rehabilitation debate, re-entry, and community-based corrections. The course will include a critical overview of problems confronting contemporary correctional institutions such as AIDS in prison, prison gangs, aging populations, physical and mental disabilities, women in prison, privatization, professionalism among correctional officers, and the use of technology in corrections. Prerequisite: admission to the M.A. in Criminal Justice Administration and Policy program. (3)

CJ 512 Executive Leadership and Organizational Change
Focuses on the administration and management of criminal justice agencies. A behavioral-systems approach to traditional and contemporary management models will be used as they relate to criminal justice agencies. Budgeting and long-range planning as well as human resource management are emphasized. The student will also study and analyze the development of various criminal justice agency policies and procedures. Emphasis will also be placed on contemporary issues faced by criminal justice agencies. Prerequisite: admission to the M.A. in Criminal Justice Administration and Policy program. (3)

CJ 520 Politics and Policy Analysis in Criminal Justice
Provides an in-depth examination of current crime policies — their foundations, political influences, and consequences — and provides students with policy analysis tools, so they can become practitioners and consumers of evaluation research in criminal justice. Prerequisite: admission to the M.A. in Criminal Justice Administration and Policy program. (3)

CJ 521 Terrorism and Counterterrorism
Using a case-study approach, this course examines the evolution of contemporary terrorism, both domestic and international, as a criminally violent tactic used to achieve political or social goals. Included will be a focus on individuals and groups, their motives and tactics, and how government and law enforcement has responded through investigation, prosecution, and punishment. Prerequisite: admission to the M.A. in Criminal Justice Administration and Policy program. (3)

CJ 550 Special Topics in Criminal Justice
Examines a number of special topics in criminal justice, such as exonerating the innocent. Topics will be announced with the schedule of classes. Prerequisite: admission to the M.A. in Criminal Justice Administration and Policy program. (3)

CJ 599 Thesis in Criminal Justice
This is the capstone course of the master’s in Criminal Justice Administration and Policy program. The course covers the master’s thesis, which must consist of an original piece of research in an area of criminal justice policy and administration chosen by the student. Prerequisite: admission to the M.A.in Criminal Justice Administration and Policy program. (6)
 
SOC 510 Theories of Social Deviance
Presents a theoretical overview of the nature and meaning of social deviance. It examines how sociologists, social psychologists, and criminologists analyze deviant behavior. Topics include anomie and conflict theories, violence, labeling and learning theory, drug use, economic and political deviance, sexual deviance, suicide and mental disorders, and physical disabilities. (3)